Artists | Meleta Bennett
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Meleta Bennett

Tumu Te Rito O Rotowhio, (Head of the National Weaving School)
  • Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Ranginui
Wānanga
Te Rito

Description Tumu Te Rito O Rotowhio, (Head of the National Weaving School) Previously a weaving tutor at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa in Rotorua, Meleta has shared her knowledge of this art form for the last 10 years. Passing on the cultural skills and practices of the elders and creating links for future generation of weavers. Although contemporary, Meleta’s work is influenced by and utilises customary techniques and materials with examples of her work exhibited nationally and internationally. "I have been fortunate to have worked alongside many great weavers during my journey, who have shared their knowledge and skills willingly over the years. Through their guidance and support and my current role at New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute this has enabled me to share my own knowledge of this art form and continue to pass on the cultural skills and practices of the elders, in turn, creating a link for future generations of new weavers.  I enjoy working with various natural mediums and continue to utilise a range of customary techniques. My art form has been inspired through engaging with and nurturing relationships with the wider indigenous weaving community, through cross cultural indigenous gatherings Nationally and Internationally."

Tumu Te Rito O Rotowhio, (Head of the National Weaving School)

Previously a weaving tutor at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa in Rotorua, Meleta has shared her knowledge of this art form for the last 10 years. Passing on the cultural skills and practices of the elders and creating links for future generation of weavers. Although contemporary, Meleta’s work is influenced by and utilises customary techniques and materials with examples of her work exhibited nationally and internationally.

“I have been fortunate to have worked alongside many great weavers during my journey, who have shared their knowledge and skills willingly over the years. Through their guidance and support and my current role at New Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts Institute this has enabled me to share my own knowledge of this art form and continue to pass on the cultural skills and practices of the elders, in turn, creating a link for future generations of new weavers.  I enjoy working with various natural mediums and continue to utilise a range of customary techniques. My art form has been inspired through engaging with and nurturing relationships with the wider indigenous weaving community, through cross cultural indigenous gatherings Nationally and Internationally.”

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